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ACTIVE

Peter Daley

Handle: vital1

Gammascout Alert detecting in microsieverts per hour (uSv/hr)

Radiation testing streaming 24/7 plus over 930 special radiation tests and original in-depth reports as June 2, 2017 as well as hundreds of items tested in Radiation Food Lab.

[CLINK LINKS FOR DIRECT ACCESS & NEWEST TO OLDEST DATA DESCENDING PAGE]

Monitoring Station: http://sccc.org.au/archives/2630

Food Lab
http://sccc.org.au/archives/2861

DATA

Jun 2, 2018 @ 18:22

Southern Hemisphere May 2018 Background Level Report

Station location

http://sccc.org.au/monitoring/Australian-Map.jpg

This short animation of Northern and Southern Hemisphere air circulation, shows why we can get detections so far south.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qh011eAYjAA

A nice quiet month without any significant background events. As most of the air flows here during this season come from a southerly direction, May local background levels were much lower than the summer months

May 2018 day average background chart

http://sccc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Caloundra-local-average-background-radiation-levels-May-2018.jpg

Caloundra May month average, year comparisons.

2018 12% above pre-Fukushima average
2017 7% above pre-Fukushima average
2016 12% above pre-Fukushima average
2015 4% above pre-Fukushima average
2014 13% above pre-Fukushima average
2013 7% above pre-Fukushima average
2012 7% above pre-Fukushima average

Disclaimer: This is an amateur volunteer run service. Human error can provide incorrect information, and equipment malfunction can produce false readings. Do not rely on, or take action upon information presented on this web site, without further research.

Southern Hemisphere April 2018 Background Level Report

Station location

http://sccc.org.au/monitoring/Australian-Map.jpg

This short animation of Northern and Southern Hemisphere air circulation, shows why we can get detections so far south.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qh011eAYjAA

This month the GammaScout Geiger Counter used for data logging local background, developed a fault. I managed to get it working again, but in the process lost some day average logging data, hence the gap in the chart.

April month averages tend to vary from year to year by a significant amount. As the Southern Hemisphere winter approaches, air flows here swing a lot between Northern Tropic air to Southern Ocean air flows. If we get more tropical air in April the background goes up. If there are more Southern Ocean air flows, the month average goes down. Since Fukushima, this has become a dynamic of the local background monitoring. If you look at the charts on the yearly average background page, link below, you can clearly see an annual winter background dip showing up in the year and month background charts.

http://sccc.org.au/yearly-average-background-radiation-levels

April 2018 day average background chart,

http://sccc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Caloundra-local-average-background-radiation-levels-April-2018.jpg

Caloundra April month average, year comparisons.

2018 24% above pre-Fukushima average
2017 11% above pre-Fukushima average
2016 33% above pre-Fukushima average
2015 6% above pre-Fukushima average
2014 22% above pre-Fukushima average
2013 9% above pre-Fukushima average
2012 12% above pre-Fukushima average

Cairns April Report – Fairly level, without any spikes. (Cairns has two monitoring Geiger counters.)

http://sccc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Cairns-April-2018.jpg

Disclaimer: This is an amateur volunteer run service. Human error can provide incorrect information, and equipment malfunction can produce false readings. Do not rely on, or take action upon information presented on this web site, without further research.

2018/04/01 at 4:03 pm

Southern Hemisphere March 2018 Background Level Report

Station location

http://sccc.org.au/monitoring/Australian-Map.jpg

This short animation of Northern and Southern Hemisphere air circulation, shows why we can get detections so far south.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qh011eAYjAA

The stats are in, and March 2018 had the highest recorded March background ever recorded here, at 46% above average. What is creating these Southern Hemisphere increases? Fukushima atmospheric contamination? Increases cosmic rays? Radon releases, or combination of all off these?

Alert Caloundra 27th March 2018 – In the morning the GammaScout Geiger counter started to alarm on and off very quickly. One visual observation showed a spike of 0.625 uSv/hr. Looking at all the very short duration high detections I have been seeing recently, it suggests to me that I am detecting lots of hot particles in the atmosphere. If I didn’t have 60 second sampling and a 0.30 uSv/hr alarm setting in place, I would probably have missed these detections. They would have been hidden in the averages, because they are of such a short duration.

The 24hr 60 second logging chart shows numerous short duration peaks between 8.30 am and 11.30 am.

http://sccc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Caloundra-24-hour-chart-270318.jpg

At the time we had one low pressure system sitting off the East coast plus another in North Queensland, look at the wind map link below. The wind map shows the local air mass at the time was coming off the Pacific Ocean. The main source appeared to be a high pressure system situated East of New Zealand. The air from it was being drawn into these two lows. This air flow was passing over this location at the time. My present theory is that contaminated air was drawn down from the upper atmosphere to the surface, by this high pressure system.

The wind direction at the time was South Easterly, off the Pacific Ocean! It was an overcast, but a fine day.

https://earth.nullschool.net/#2018/03/27/0600Z/wind/surface/level/orthographic=-192.66,-35.51,1343/loc=146.465,4.276

On the 27th March Radon levels where relatively low.
http://sccc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/ThereminoGeiger_2018_03_27_21_16_00.png

March 2018 day average background chart, (What the bar chart colour codes mean.)

http://sccc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Caloundra-local-average-background-radiation-levels-March-2018.jpg

Caloundra March month average, year comparisons.

2018 46% above pre-Fukushima average
2017 38% above pre-Fukushima average
2016 39% above pre-Fukushima average
2015 33% above pre-Fukushima average
2014 31% above pre-Fukushima average
2013 32% above pre-Fukushima average
2012 24% above pre-Fukushima average

Year and month average local background radiation levels from 2007 to 2018.

http://sccc.org.au/yearly-average-background-radiation-levels

Disclaimer: This is an amateur volunteer run service. Human error can provide incorrect information, and equipment malfunction can produce false readings. Do not rely on, or take action upon information presented on this web site, without further research.

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