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Southern Hemisphere May 2019 Background Level Report

Station location

http://sccc.org.au/monitoring/Australian-Map.jpg

This short animation of Northern and Southern Hemisphere air circulation, shows why we can get detections so far south.

May 2019 day average background chart. (Month Average 108 cpm)

http://sccc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Caloundra-local-average-background-radiation-levels-May-2019.jpg

Disclaimer: This is an amateur volunteer run service. Human error can provide incorrect information, and equipment malfunction can produce false readings. Do not rely on, or take action upon information presented on this web site, without further research.

Southern Hemisphere April 2019 Background Level Report

Station location

http://sccc.org.au/monitoring/Australian-Map.jpg

This short animation of Northern and Southern Hemisphere air circulation, shows why we can get detections so far south.

April 2019 Report. (Month Average 108 cpm)
As we move into the cooler months here in the Southern hemisphere, the month average background levels decrease. This seasonal variation in background happens every year as we get more southern ocean air flows in the cooler months. In the warmer months we get more tropical air flows.

April 2019 day average background chart.

http://sccc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Caloundra-local-average-background-radiation-levels-April-2019.jpg

Disclaimer: This is an amateur volunteer run service. Human error can provide incorrect information, and equipment malfunction can produce false readings. Do not rely on, or take action upon information presented on this web site, without further research.

Southern Hemisphere February & March 2019 Background Radiation Level Report

Station location

http://sccc.org.au/monitoring/Australian-Map.jpg

This short animation of Northern and Southern Hemisphere air circulation, shows why we can get detections so far south.

March 2019 Report.

We finally received around 300mm of rain in March, decent rain after an exceptionally dry period.

Towards the latter part of March, around when the rain started, a number of very short detection spikes showed up in the 24 hour charts.

Below are examples of a couple of the larger spike detections.

It is normal to occasionally get background spikes, three times background or less. These detections were less than three times background, so are probably not anything to be concerned about.

http://sccc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Caloundra-24-hour-chart-180319.jpg

http://sccc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Caloundra-24-hour-chart-310319.jpg

March 2019 day average background chart.

http://sccc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Caloundra-local-average-background-radiation-levels-March-2019.jpg

February 2019 Report.

February was exceptionally dry. February is usually one of our wettest months here.

February 2019 day average background chart.

http://sccc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Caloundra-local-average-background-radiation-levels-February-2019.jpg

Disclaimer: This is an amateur volunteer run service. Human error can provide incorrect information, and equipment malfunction can produce false readings. Do not rely on, or take action upon information presented on this web site, without further research.

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